7/21/2021

STUDIO HAPPILY OPEN!

SEASCAPE
Chinese ink and watercolour on Stonehenge paper, 8" x 30" 
Unframed archival prints available / $100







My studio is a quiet place where I spend a lot of time and feel at peace. It is like working in "plein air" with its double-garage door opened during the gorgeous days of summer. 

Even if its now fall with its stormy weather, you are always welcome to visit me in my studio: my display is a permanent one, in continuous growth as I keep exploring with clay or brush with ink or acrylic. There are almost always new brush work on the walls, new clay objects on the shelves as well as cards, original art ones and printed ones.

YOU ARE WELCOME TO STOP BY WHEN MY OPEN SIGNS ARE UP

1372 PILOT WAY, NANOOSE BAY(corner of Marina Way) 

RING THE BELL IF I AM NOT IN VIEW

OR CONTACT ME FIRST 

250-240-2366

mariepaquette@shaw.ca

4/10/2021

ONE INK STROKE WITH A CEDAR BARK BRUSH







silencing the mind

emptying it of any intention

of any expectation

 

hand, arm and body

moving the brush

in harmony with the breath

eye gazing on the white of the paper 

ahead of the stroke taking shape

 

putting the brush to rest

welcoming a unique stroke
complete and perfect 



In the following 20-second video,
my dear friend Ann Gruchy captured
the unpredictable dance of a cedar bark brush:


In 2010, I attended a fabulous workshop given by Lorne Loomer at MISSA: Brush Explorations. Knowing we were going to make our own brushes from cedar bark sparked my imagination! All week, Lorne gently invited us to empty our minds before dipping our newly made brushes in the darkness of the ink and letting it dance its “one stroke” on the white of the paper. A single stroke so perfectly “exquisite” that no changes were needed. 


Ever since, the exploration continues. I keep collecting cedar bark, which efficiently holds the ink and happily stays wet for a long time. I always make new brushes, each one unique. It is impossible to predict the stroke it will leave on the paper. It is also impossible to control such a brush and mostly, impossible to repeat a stroke. The secret of a harmonious partnership with a cedar bark brush is to let it lead the dance and when you do, surprising results, often deeply moving, come to life. 


The practice is not as easy as it seems and is often a lesson in humility, as Jack Wise, Lorne Loomer’s teacher, said in a beautiful NFB documentary, “Language of the Brush”: “If a composition has some really bad stuff in it, then I take responsibility for that but if something comes through that is creatively unique, then as the Japanese say: “Muga” / It’s not I who did this, it is a larger self of which we are all composed.” 


Over the years, I have kept exploring beyond one-stroke, which has led to more elaborate compositions. Also, by adding water media, pigments, ash into the wet ink, surprising interactions create unique patterns and textures. Variations are infinite and the exploration exciting! 

“You don’t know what’s going to happen – it’s like flying.” 

(Kazuaki Tanahashi, “Brush Mind”) 



This text was published on line in the Island Arts Magazine, issue #54

1/26/2021

THE GOLDEN SERIE / 2020


KING TIDE
Ink and acrylic on mixed media paper, 5.5” x 15”, NFS


UNTITLED
Ink and acrylic on mixed media paper
mounted on wood panel
5.5" x 15" / $90
HIGH RETREAT
Ink and acrylic on mixed media paper
mounted on wood panel
5.5" x 15” / $90

SENTRIES
Ink and acrylic on mixed media paper, 5.5” x 15”, framed / $100

1/15/2020

BEACHCOMBER IMPRESSIONS: A UNIQUE LINE OF CLAY OBJECTS


Weather permitting, I walk to Beachcomber Park with small blocks of clay looking for interesting rock formation to press my clay against; I need a surface that once imprinted into the clay will give a "rocky" character to it. Then 
I start carving out the clay to create a container: a goblet, a box or little vases.

Stoneware, 5" x 3.5' x 1.5" / $55

Some other times, I press a slab instead of a block onto the rocks, stretching it at the same time; it can then become a plate or be shaped as a vase. 

It is a perfect activity for warm sunny days when the rocks are dry!
Stoneware, 5.5" high x 3.75" in diameter/$55




READ MORE ABOUT THESE 
"PLEIN AIR CLAYING" SESSIONS
IN THE ON-LINE ISSUE #50/JUNE-AUGUST OF
ISLAND ARTS MAGAZINE 

9/26/2017

BRUSH EXPLORATIONS OF AN OLD JAPANESE TECHNIQUE

CONTEMPORARY NIHONGA


In July 2017, I attended a 5-day workshop with Judith Kruger at MISSA (Metchosin Summer School of Arts):
ABSTRACT ALCHEMY/ BLACK, WHITE AND WARM METALLICS.

It was an introduction to NIHONGA, an ancient Asian painting technique and its contemporary form. 

Natural pigments/natural binder, silver leaves/oxidized
on Wc paper mounted on masonite, 9" x 14" /SOLD

Natural pigments/natural binder, silver leaves/oxidized
on Wc paper mounted on wood panel covered with textured paper, 6" x 15" /  $200

Japanese ink and acrylic ink on Chinese paper 13" x 15.5"; black metal frame with glass, 17" x 21" SOLD
ARCS EN CIEL   Inks on Japanese paper; 12' x 12" / SOLD
DRIFTING MEMORIES, Sumi ink and pigments on Stonehenge paper, 12" x 36" / $400
  "SWIRLING", triptych, inks on Stonehenge paper, 3 x 10" x 10" / $300 
"RAGING SEA", triptych, inks on Stonehenge paper, 3 x 10" x 10" / $300

10/28/2012

DÉMARCHE ARTISTIQUE - CLAY PROCESS


(POUR UNE VERSION EN FRANÇAIS, VOIR PLUS BAS)

I approach clay with attention rather than intention and only have a vague idea of what the final object might look like. It is by paying attention to how clay responds to manipulations that I can see the new object coming to life, the form suggesting itself through the different stages of the shaping process. I like to think I work in collaboration with clay.


Details are addressed with care, taking the time needed to resolve any issues the best I can at this point in time. Glazing is also a very important step: each object, in its uniqueness, requires a surface decoration that –hopefully- will add up to a harmonious whole, taking into account the atmospheric reduction of a wood firing kiln as well as the large part played by toasting flames and melting ash. Finally, I surrender my clay objects to the fire never knowing what to expect while hoping, all through the intense hours of stoking, for unpredictable surprises!

J’approche l'argile avec attention plutôt qu'avec intention. Je n'ai au départ qu'une vague idée de ce dont l'objet aura l'air en bout de ligne. C'est en portant attention à la façon dont l'argile répond à la manipulation que je vois la forme de l'objet se suggérer aux différentes étapes du façonnage. J'aime croire que je travaille en collaboration avec l'argile.

Je soigne les détails, prends le temps nécessaire pour résoudre les problèmes au meilleur de ma connaissance. La décoration est une étape très importante : chaque objet est unique et sa surface demande donc un traitement qui, je l'espère, en fera un tout harmonieux. Je garde en tête la réduction atmosphérique du four à bois, les flammes qui caresseront et rôtiront l'objet et les cendres qui, en fondant, se transformeront en une glaçure naturelle. Je confie mes objets d'argile au feu sans jamais vraiment savoir à quoi m'attendre mais espérant, tout au long des intenses heures de cuisson, d’heureuses surprises!

8/24/2012

PURE ABSTRACTION

(POUR UNE VERSION EN FRANÇAIS, VOIR PLUS BAS)

I never imagined that I had any abstract fibers in me until I was exposed to Lila Lewis Irving’s  powerful and moving “non-objective abstractions”.

"GOLDEN POND" , 18" X 18"/ SOLD
Acrylic, with its textural viscosity, is the perfect medium to support such abstraction. The paint is barely diluted before being poured on paper or canvas, which allows me to move it and shape it following my intuition and paying constant attention to what is happening rather than imposing and pursuing my own intention.

The essential –and the challenge- of this approach which so strongly attracts me is to empty the mind and maintain this meditative state so the gesture can manifest itself  freely.


NOTE Since my signature is in the back of the paintings, you can hang them the way you want.


"MAYBE", 10" X 20" / SOLD
Je n’aurais jamais cru que j’avais au fond de moi un quelconque potentiel d’abstraction jusqu’à ce que je découvre l’émouvant pouvoir des “abstractions non-objectives” de Lila Lewis Irving.

Par sa viscosité, l’acrylique se prête merveilleusement bien à cette exploration texturale abstraite. La peinture est à peine diluée avant d’être versée sur le papier ou la toile, ce qui me permet de la déplacer et de lui donner forme en suivant mon intuition et en portant une constante attention à ce qui survient plutôt qu’en cherchant à imposer et poursuivre ma propre intention.

L’essentiel –et le défi- de cette approche qui m’attire tant est de faire le vide mentalement et de maintenir cet état méditatif pour que le geste puisse se manifester sans contrainte.

NOTE  Étant signés à l’endos, mes tableaux pourront être suspendus
comme bon vous semblera.

"LE BATEAU IVRE" "MY BOAT HAS BEEN DRINKING",
20" X 30" / SOLD